Down the TBR Hole #32

Welcome folks to the thirty-second round of Down the TBR Hole! For those of you who have no idea what I’m talking about, check out the previous posts via the tag or check out Lia at Lost in a Story who is the creator of this wonderful meme/project.

I’m trying to make this a regular feature of my blogging schedule because it’s good to regularly reevaluate if/why you want to read a book – that way you don’t come back to your TBR years later and have no clue why a title piqued your interest in the first place. I’ve also added a summary of results bit at the bottom of each round so I can track how many books I’ve kept and ditched from my TBR shelf in each round and overall.

Just a reminder of how this works:

  • Go to your goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added.
  • Take the first 5 (or 10 if you’re feeling adventurous) books
  • Read the synopses of the books
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?

Outside of doing these posts semi-regularly I have also been culling my TBR list at random points when I’m bored – all of this is good in terms of getting my TBR to a reasonable amount of books but it also means that these posts are getting harder for me to do as I’m beginning to really agonise over whether to ditch or keep books on there. Not that any of this is a bad thing! Let’s get going on the 10 books under scrutiny today…

1. What We See When We Read by Peter Mendelsund

Why is it there? The entire concept of the book intrigues me: Medelsund is a book jacket designer and the book considers how we visualise images whilst reading books such as Anna Karenina or Moby Dick. How people visualise characters and scenes differently to other readers and perhaps how the author even intended it is kinda odd but I think it would be interesting to read a book about it?
Do I own it? No
Verdict? Keep

2. The Accidental by Ali Smith

Why is it there? I’ve never read Ali Smith. I don’t know where to start when trying Ali Smith’s writing but I picked up this novel at a charity shop so it made its way onto my shelves and so onto my Goodreads TBR. Is this a good place to start this her books? Enlighten me if you’ve read her!
Do I own it? Yes
Verdict? Keep

3. The Gargoyle by Andrew Davidson

Why is it there? I actually know next to nothing about this book, it’s a historical… fantasy, I think? I’m not sure but I actually don’t know how it got onto my TBR in the first place so this is an easy one.. Convince me I’m wrong?
Do I own it? No
Verdict? Ditch

4. Blackout by Connie Willis

Why is it there? I think this has something to do with time travel and WWII and that’s about all I know/remember. As far as I can see, no one I know on Goodreads has read it, and the reviews on there aren’t too great either so yikes…
Do I own it? No
Verdict? Ditch

5. Between Shades of Grey by Ruta Sepetys

Why is it there? A while back you couldn’t move on Booktube or the book blogging world for reviews of this, a historical fiction set in WWII about a Lithuanian family. Aaand that’s pretty much all I know about it. I’m told it’s harrowing… which is what will probably make me constantly put off reading this. (I know, I’m a terrible person for wanting to ditch this.)
Do I own it? No
Verdict? 
Ditch

6. Jane Austen’s Textual Lives: From Aeschylus to Bollywood by Kathryn Sutherland

Why is it there? This is another one of those books that I probably added to my Goodreads TBR when I optimistically still thought I’d be reading critical analysis and academic essay collections even after leaving university. That delusion has quickly shattered and I no longer have such a huge yearning to get to this anytime soon.
Do I own it? No
Verdict? Ditch

7. Hausfrau by Jill Alexander Essbaum

Why is it there? I don’t know how I came to know about this book, much less feel compelled to add it to my TBR, so I presume I was taken in by the gorgeous cover. Sounds like a reasonable explanation. However, I haven’t seen any particularly glowing reviews for it and although it’s allegedly “an unforgettable story of marriage, fidelity, sex, morality, and most especially self” I’m just not gripped by the prospect of that? I’m clearly quite picky when it comes to literary fiction…
Do I own it? No
Verdict? Ditch

8. The Book of Strange New Things by Michel Faber

Why is it there? Will I ever get around to trying out a Michel Faber book? I don’t even know if I’m likely to enjoy them. However, when I’ve looked into this particular book I’m told it’s light on the sci-fi detail and actually focuses on themes about marriage, religion and humanity and I’m just… that doesn’t really grab me?
Do I own it? No
Verdict? Ditch

9. Prudence by Gail Carriger

Why is it there? I put this book on my TBR shelf when I first read Soulless, the first book in Gail Carriger’s adult series. I’ve actually never read further than that first book so it seems a bit optimistic of me to put the first book in a different series on my TBR too!
Do I own it? No
Verdict? Ditch

10. The Blazing World by Siri Hustvedt

Why is it there? This book first came across my radar because of the incredibly colourful cover and the name – I loved Margaret Cavendish’s The Blazing World when I read it as part of a university course and I presume this book is somewhat based on/inspired by that? It’s basically because of that that this survives the chop this time, even though I very rarely ever prioritise literary fiction, oops.
Do I own it? No
Verdict? Keep


This round:
Kept – 3
Ditched – 7

Overall:
Kept – 155
Ditched – 165

That’s all folks for the thirty-second round of my Down the TBR Hole project. I’ve become a lot more cutthroat nowadays with getting rid of books from this Goodreads TBR shelf, but it’s still at 670 books so I foresee many more rounds in the future.

But have I made a terrible mistake in ditching some of these titles? Or have I kept some that really aren’t worth my time? Let me know in the comments below!


Goodreads | Twitter Instagram

Down the TBR Hole #31

Welcome folks to the thirty-first round of Down the TBR Hole! For those of you who have no idea what I’m talking about, check out the previous posts via the tag or check out Lia at Lost in a Story who is the creator of this wonderful meme/project.

I’m trying to make this a regular feature of my blogging schedule because it’s good to regularly reevaluate if/why you want to read a book – that way you don’t come back to your TBR years later and have no clue why a title piqued your interest in the first place. I’ve also added a summary of results bit at the bottom of each round so I can track how many books I’ve kept and ditched from my TBR shelf in each round and overall.

Just a reminder of how this works:

  • Go to your goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added.
  • Take the first 5 (or 10 if you’re feeling adventurous) books
  • Read the synopses of the books
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?

Outside of doing these posts semi-regularly I have also been culling my TBR list at random points when I’m bored – all of this is good in terms of getting my TBR to a reasonable amount of books but it also means that these posts are getting harder for me to do as I’m beginning to really agonise over whether to ditch or keep books on there. Not that any of this is a bad thing! Let’s get going on the 10 books under scrutiny today…

1. The Communist Manifesto by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels

Why is it there? You know when you go through a political philosophy course at university and you ambitiously think you’ll probably read all the set texts, well, this is one of those. Not only did I not read it (despite it being well under 100 pages), I didn’t feel like any Marxist critique applied in a literature essay really needed to have read the source material because it has become so ubiquitous anyway. (What probably helped this onto my TBR was that this, and some of the following books, were part of a series called Penguin Great Ideas and they were available in cute, handy little paperbacks.)
Do I own it? No
Verdict? Ditch

2. The Social Contract by Rousseau

Why is it there? See above tbh.
Do I own it? No
Verdict? Ditch

3. On the Shortness of Life by Seneca

Why is it there? See above.
Do I own it? No
Verdict? Ditch

4. Of the Abuse of Words by John Locke

Why is it there? See above.
Do I own it? No
Verdict? Ditch

5. The Spectacle of the Scaffold by Michel Foucault

Why is it there? See above.
Do I own it? No
Verdict? 
Ditch

6. Memoirs of a Teenage Amnesiac by Gabrielle Zevin

Why is it there? I was somewhat puzzled by how this random YA book had ended up on my TBR until I went on Goodreads and realised it’s a favourite of Booktuber extraordinaire, Ariel Bisett. Now I’m not altogether surprised it’s on my ‘to read’ list, but, having actually looked what it is about, I’m not sure I’m really into it any more. Happy to be convinced I’m wrong if anyone wants to take on the task.
Do I own it? No
Verdict? Ditch

7. Will You Please Be Quiet, Please? by Raymond Carver

Why is it there? I had an unfortunate tendency to add anything ex-Booktuber Barry Pierce was reading and vaguely recommended. (It’s still a source of great sadness that he’s no longer blessing YouTube with his cuttingly insightful reviews.) But I’m still yet to get to this short story collection which he recommended, largely because I’m not the hugest fan of short stories so it takes something really special to make me prioritise reading them over other things.
Do I own it? No
Verdict? Ditch

8. Vendetta by Catherine Doyle

Why is it there? Catherine Doyle is one of those authors I’ve seen on many an author’s Instagram and Twitter, I think she hangs around in the same UK/Irish YA crowd that I’m vaguely familiar with from their social media interactions at the very least. Unfortunately, I’m yet to even think about reading this, the first book in her ‘Blood for Blood’ series which is described as Romeo and Juliet meets The Godfather which sounds very accurate from just this one line of the synopsis: “Sophie finds herself falling into a criminal underworld governed by powerful families”. Unfortunately, I don’t ever really see me being super inclined to prioritise this one on my TBR so I think it might be time to say goodbye?
Do I own it? No
Verdict? Ditch

9. Slouching Towards Bethlehem by Joan Didion

Why is it there? I’ve never read any Joan Didion, which is pretty much why it’s there, but I presume Barry Pierce also recommended it at some point. Have I read it? Nope. Have I even thought about reading it? Nope. I really must stop doing this.
Do I own it? No
Verdict? Ditch

10. Well-Read Women: Portraits of Fiction’s Most Beloved Heroines by Samantha Hahn

Why is it there? I find it interesting when fellow readers fancast their characters, especially so when who they have been picturing in their head whilst reading a book seems vastly different to who I’ve been picturing in my head whilst reading the book. So, this book seems right up my street. It looks to be a really stunningly illustrated book and it has 50 portraits of well-known heroines from literature, from Mrs Dalloway to Anna Karenina. I’m really intrigued to see how Samantha Hahn has chosen to depict these infamous literary figures in her portraits, and to see if they are how I also pictured them. I’m not sure how I will ever acquire this book since it seems the ‘coffee table’/’gift edition’ sort, but I guess I’ll have to see if I can persuade a relative or friend to gift me it one birthday or Christmas.
Do I own it? No
Verdict? Keep


This round:
Kept – 1
Ditched – 9

Overall:
Kept – 152
Ditched – 158

That’s all folks for the thirty-first round of my Down the TBR Hole project. I’m struggling more and more nowadays to ditch books, but maybe that means I’m starting to get to down to the books I actually do want to read without the extraneous titles? We can live in hope, anyhow, because I still have a hell of a lot of books on my TBR so let’s hope I never fall out of love with reading as my TBR currently stands at 678 books!

But have I made a terrible mistake in ditching some of these titles? Or have I kept some that really aren’t worth my time? Let me know in the comments below!


Goodreads | Twitter Instagram

Down the TBR Hole #30

Welcome folks to the thirtieth round of Down the TBR Hole! For those of you who have no idea what I’m talking about, check out the previous posts via the tag or check out Lia at Lost in a Story who is the creator of this wonderful meme/project.

I’m trying to make this a regular feature of my blogging schedule because it’s good to regularly reevaluate if/why you want to read a book – that way you don’t come back to your TBR years later and have no clue why a title piqued your interest in the first place. I’ve also added a summary of results bit at the bottom of each round so I can track how many books I’ve kept and ditched from my TBR shelf in each round and overall.

Just a reminder of how this works:

  • Go to your goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added.
  • Take the first 5 (or 10 if you’re feeling adventurous) books
  • Read the synopses of the books
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?

Outside of doing these posts semi-regularly I have also been culling my TBR list at random points when I’m bored – all of this is good in terms of getting my TBR to a reasonable amount of books but it also means that these posts are getting harder for me to do as I’m beginning to really agonise over whether to ditch or keep books on there. Not that any of this is a bad thing! Let’s get going on the 10 books under scrutiny today…

1. White Oleander by Janet Fitch

Why is it there? I’ve read many a review of this book saying it’s beautiful and brilliant writing and a dark and disturbing story. But, here’s the thing, I’ve also read the synopsis repeatedly and I still don’t think I’m at all interested in the content of the story at all. Happy to be proven wrong but, until then…
Do I own it? No
Verdict? Ditch

2. Men We Reaped by Jesmyn Ward

Why is it there? Everyone says this is a hauntingly powerful memoir about grief, race, and poverty from Jesmyn Ward. It chronicles the death of five men in her life. I know this would be a difficult read. I know this is probably an important read. I know that this would probably be a read that would transport me to an entirely different place and experience so distant from my own. And I feel like the worst kind of person ever for saying this but I just… I don’t see myself honestly reaching for this anytime soon. I know, I know, I’m a terrible person, don’t think I don’t have guilt over not wanting to read this.
Do I own it? No
Verdict? Ditch

3. Thinking About It Only Makes It Worse by David Mitchell

Why is it there? This book is one of an assortment I have on my non-fiction humour shelf. You know the sort – the books that you might read on the loo, the books that even non-readers could be persuaded to read if they were gifted them at Christmas, the books that I’ll probably only get to in fits and starts and never actually read cover to cover. Knowing that I have an entire stack of those in my dining room shelves means I don’t really need to have it on my TBR shelf on Goodreads, I’m not likely to forget it exists.
Do I own it? Yes
Verdict? Ditch Continue reading

Down the TBR Hole #29

Welcome folks to the twenty-ninth round of Down the TBR Hole! For those of you who have no idea what I’m talking about, check out the previous posts via the tag or check out Lia at Lost in a Story who is the creator of this wonderful meme/project.

I’m trying to make this a regular feature of my blogging schedule because it’s good to regularly reevaluate if/why you want to read a book – that way you don’t come back to your TBR years later and have no clue why a title piqued your interest in the first place. I’ve also added a summary of results bit at the bottom of each round so I can track how many books I’ve kept and ditched from my TBR shelf in each round and overall.

Just a reminder of how this works:

  • Go to your goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added.
  • Take the first 5 (or 10 if you’re feeling adventurous) books
  • Read the synopses of the books
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?

Outside of doing these posts semi-regularly I have also been culling my TBR list at random points when I’m bored – all of this is good in terms of getting my TBR to a reasonable amount of books but it also means that these posts are getting harder for me to do as I’m beginning to really agonise over whether to ditch or keep books on there. Not that any of this is a bad thing! Let’s get going on the 10 books under scrutiny today…

1. Blankets by Craig Thompson

Why is it there? This was a product of needing to find a graphic novel over 500 pages for the Tome Topple readathon. It’s the one people always reference when they put together TBRs for it, and it’s meant to be very touching in its own right. The problem is, I rarely read graphic novels, let alone tomes of graphic novels, because I don’t buy them and my library doesn’t stock them. So it seems I’m unlikely to ever acquire this and therefore unlikely to ever actually read it, as much as I might have an inclination some day…
Do I own it? No
Verdict? Ditch

2. Everything Leads to You by Nina LaCour

Why is it there? This first came onto my radar through a Booktube video about LGBTQ reads. It stayed on my radar because the main character Emi is a set designer – I love anything that is a sort of ‘behind the scenes’ of a creative industry, such as the film industry. I’ve heard great things about this but I’ve never seen it ‘out in the wild’ so to speak so it may take a little bit of tracking down for me to get my hands on a copy. I’m more than willing to do that though, obviously.
Do I own it? No
Verdict? Keep

3. The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco

Why is it there? It’s described by some as a medieval murder mystery set in an abbey in Italy so of course I added this to my TBR at some point. It’s been rated quite highly by a few people I follow on Goodreads which always stands a book in good stead. Apart from that, I don’t know what to expect. I don’t know anything of Umberto Eco’s writing style (though I’m sure the quality of the translation from Italian will play more of a part in my eventual enjoyment or disappointment) nor do I know anyone ‘in real life’ who has read his works so I think I’m going into this pretty much blind, and I’m ok with not knowing what to expect for once.
Do I own it? Yes
Verdict? Keep Continue reading

Down the TBR Hole #28

Welcome folks to the twenty-eighth round of Down the TBR Hole! For those of you who have no idea what I’m talking about, check out the previous posts via the tag or check out Lia at Lost in a Story who is the creator of this wonderful meme/project.

I’m trying to make this a regular feature of my blogging schedule because it’s good to regularly reevaluate if/why you want to read a book – that way you don’t come back to your TBR years later and have no clue why a title piqued your interest in the first place. I’ve also added a summary of results bit at the bottom of each round so I can track how many books I’ve kept and ditched from my TBR shelf in each round and overall.

Just a reminder of how this works:

  • Go to your goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added.
  • Take the first 5 (or 10 if you’re feeling adventurous) books
  • Read the synopses of the books
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?

Outside of doing these posts semi-regularly I have also been culling my TBR list at random points when I’m bored – all of this is good in terms of getting my TBR to a reasonable amount of books but it also means that these posts are getting harder for me to do as I’m beginning to really agonise over whether to ditch or keep books on there. Not that any of this is a bad thing! Let’s get going on the 10 books under scrutiny today…

1. Metamorphosis and Other Stories by Franz Kafka

Why is it there? I tend to be really bad at reading (modern) classics in translation. Here’s the thing: I felt bad about this (and wanted to correct it) when I was at university, surrounded by people who talked about modern classics, something which I was (read: still am) horribly out of touch with. But I don’t really care to “correct that” anymore just for the sake of feeling more “well read”.
Do I own it? No
Verdict? Ditch

2. Precarious Life: The Powers of Mourning and Violence by Judith Butler

Why is it there? So this is a bit of theory I added to my TBR when I was at university and this was referenced in some of my secondary reading. It sounded super interesting as it explores the idea of how mourning and violence operates in a post-9/11 America. Now I’m out of university I don’t have such ready access to this kind of secondary reading so it’s unlikely I’ll ever get to this, to be honest.
Do I own it? No
Verdict? Ditch

3. The Hours by Michael Cunningham

Why is it there? I genuinely can’t remember how this got onto my TBR. It allegedly “recasts the classic story of Woolf’s Mrs Dalloway in a startling new light” which makes me even more suspicious of how this ended up on my TBR in the first place because I really haven’t got along with what I’ve read of Virginia Woolf so why on earth would I think this would interest me at all?
Do I own it? No
Verdict? Ditch Continue reading

Down the TBR Hole #27

Welcome folks to the twenty-seventh round of Down the TBR Hole! For those of you who have no idea what I’m talking about, check out the previous posts via the tag or check out Lia at Lost in a Story who is the creator of this wonderful meme/project.

I’m trying to make this a regular feature of my blogging schedule because it’s good to regularly reevaluate if/why you want to read a book – that way you don’t come back to your TBR years later and have no clue why a title piqued your interest in the first place. I’ve also added a summary of results bit at the bottom of each round so I can track how many books I’ve kept and ditched from my TBR shelf in each round and overall.

Just a reminder of how this works:

  • Go to your goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added.
  • Take the first 5 (or 10 if you’re feeling adventurous) books
  • Read the synopses of the books
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?

Outside of doing these posts semi-regularly I have also been culling my TBR list at random points when I’m bored – all of this is good in terms of getting my TBR to a reasonable amount of books but it also means that these posts are getting harder for me to do as I’m beginning to really agonise over whether to ditch or keep books on there. Not that any of this is a bad thing! Let’s get going on the 10 books under scrutiny today…

1. Shakespeare And The Loss Of Eden: The Construction Of Family Values In Early Modern Culture by Catherine Belsey

Why is it there? As you might have gathered from previous Down the TBR Hole posts, sometimes in the past I have gone through weird phases of suddenly adding more academic books to my TBR – this is one of those. That’s not to say that I’m not not interested in the book nowadays, it’s just that now I’m out of education, it’s harder to both get hold of the book (no more university inter-library loans) and to find the motivation to actually read it.
Do I own it? No
Verdict? Ditch

2. Over Her Dead Body: Death, Femininity and the Aesthetic by Elisabeth Bronfen

Why is it there? Much like the previous title, this is an academic title that I added whilst on a roll at university. I’m still interested in the concepts this book undoubtedly addresses but it’s not something that I can foresee casually picking up of an afternoon, you know?
Do I own it? No
Verdict? Ditch

3. Where Angels Fear to Tread by E.M. Forster

Why is it there? Last year I read A Room with A View and Howards End and was really very pleasantly surprised to find that I thoroughly enjoyed both of them. I didn’t know anything about E.M. Forster or his writing before I’d picked them up – and I think that was probably why I ended up being so positively surprised by what I found. I’m hoping that will continue to be the case sometime in the future when I get round to this one…
Do I own it? Yes
Verdict? Keep Continue reading

Down the TBR Hole #26

Welcome folks to the twenty-sixth round of Down the TBR Hole! For those of you who have no idea what I’m talking about, check out the previous posts via the tag or check out Lia at Lost in a Story who is the creator of this wonderful meme/project.

I’m trying to make this a regular feature of my blogging schedule because it’s good to regularly reevaluate if/why you want to read a book – that way you don’t come back to your TBR years later and have no clue why a title piqued your interest in the first place. I’ve also added a summary of results bit at the bottom of each round so I can track how many books I’ve kept and ditched from my TBR shelf in each round and overall.

Just a reminder of how this works:

  • Go to your goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added.
  • Take the first 5 (or 10 if you’re feeling adventurous) books
  • Read the synopses of the books
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?

Outside of doing these posts semi-regularly I have also been culling my TBR list at random points when I’m bored – all of this is good in terms of getting my TBR to a reasonable amount of books but it also means that these posts are getting harder for me to do as I’m beginning to really agonise over whether to ditch or keep books on there. Not that any of this is a bad thing! Let’s get going on the 10 books under scrutiny today…

1. Elizabeth Costello by J.M. Coetzee

Why is it there? I have literally no idea why this is still on my TBR. I likely added it at the same time as I bought/added Disgrace to my TBR but I’m still yet to read a single word of J.M. Coetzee’s writing. I don’t think I’ll be getting to this one anytime soon because even the synopsis hasn’t really piqued my interest.
Do I own it? No
Verdict? Ditch

2. The Clockwork Muse: A Practical Guide to Writing Theses, Dissertations & Books by Eviatar Zerubavel

Why is it there? I’m really not very sure how this book came onto my radar or my TBR, but it actually sounds like a very useful thing – it seems to be about the creative process (whether that’s writing an essay or a novel) and how to carve out the best time in your daily routine for writing. Considering I forced myself to do so last month during NaNoWriMo and it was relatively successful in terms of getting words down, maybe I should read this and see if I can continue that spirit? I’m not sure if it will be completely helpful to the novel writing side of things since all the reviews on Goodreads say it’s good advice for tackling long-form academic writing, but it’s worth a go.
Do I own it? No
Verdict? Keep

3. City of Stairs by Robert Jackson Bennett

Why is it there? This sounds like a really intriguing fantasy concept where, according to the synopsis, “When the gods were destroyed and all worship of them banned by the Polis, reality folded; now stairs lead to nowhere, alleyways have become portals to the past, and criminals disappear into thin air”. I mean, that just sounds straight up intriguing, doesn’t it? A few of my Goodreads friends have read this and given it reasonably high ratings so I think that’s enough reason for it to survive this cull.
Do I own it? No
Verdict? Keep Continue reading

Down the TBR Hole #25

Welcome folks to the twenty-fifth round of Down the TBR Hole! For those of you who have no idea what I’m talking about, check out the previous posts via the tag or check out Lia at Lost in a Story who is the creator of this wonderful meme/project.

I’m trying to make this a regular feature of my blogging schedule because it’s good to regularly reevaluate if/why you want to read a book – that way you don’t come back to your TBR years later and have no clue why a title piqued your interest in the first place. I’ve also added a summary of results bit at the bottom of each round so I can track how many books I’ve kept and ditched from my TBR shelf in each round and overall.

Just a reminder of how this works:

  • Go to your goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added.
  • Take the first 5 (or 10 if you’re feeling adventurous) books
  • Read the synopses of the books
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?

Outside of doing these posts semi-regularly I have also been culling my TBR list at random points when I’m bored – all of this is good in terms of getting my TBR to a reasonable amount of books but it also means that these posts are getting harder for me to do as I’m beginning to really agonise over whether to ditch or keep books on there. Not that any of this is a bad thing! Let’s get going on the 10 books under scrutiny today…

1. Afterworlds by Scott Westerfeld

Why is it there? The concept of this was too good to pass on: it tells of a young, aspiring author who gets a book deal for her YA novel, moves to New York, and ends up in the world of publishing and maybe falling in love along the way? Meanwhile, in alternate chapters, her YA novel is told to the reader too. And I presume there’s some kind of connection and parallel to be drawn etc. etc. and it all sounds so very meta. I haven’t read anything Scott Westerfeld before and I’m sure this would be a good way for me to get into trying his writing out as I love books about books.
Do I own it? Yes
Verdict? Keep

2. The Bookshop Book by Jen Campbell

Why is it there? I absolutely adore Jen Campbell’s Booktube so it’s no surprise that when she said she was writing a book about bookshops, I jumped at adding this to my TBR list. I still haven’t read it, mostly because I have to be really in the mood for anything non-fiction, but this definitely feels like a book I will pick up and put down when the moment strikes and I’ll love hearing about some of her favourite bookshops.
Do I own it? Yes
Verdict? Keep

3. The Paper Magician by Charlie N. Holmberg

Why is it there? A while back, this first book in a series was always either cheap or free on Kindle, so it kept popping up on my Amazon lists when I scrolled through the ebooks on offer. I briefly looked into it and, from the blurb, was told it was about paper magic. That seemed like a damn good enough reason for a book-obsessed girl to add it to her (at the time) not very large TBR. However, since then, I’ve read books with out-of-the-box magic systems and enjoyed them so, as harsh as this sounds, I feel like this book looks like a case of a great concept but perhaps (maybe possibly) with not good enough writing to pull it off. That sounds way harsh but yeah I think that’s what has put me off picking this one up for all this time… eek!
Do I own it? No
Verdict? Ditch Continue reading

Down the TBR Hole #24

Welcome folks to the twenty-fourth round of Down the TBR Hole!

For those of you who have no idea what I’m talking about, check out the previous posts via the tag or check out Lia at Lost in a Story who is the creator of this wonderful meme/project.

I’m trying to make this a regular feature of my blogging schedule because it’s good to regularly reevaluate if/why you want to read a book – that way you don’t come back to your TBR years later and have no clue why a title piqued your interest in the first place. I’ve also added a summary of results bit at the bottom of each round so I can track how many books I’ve kept and ditched from my TBR shelf in each round and overall.

Just a reminder of how this works:

  • Go to your goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added.
  • Take the first 5 (or 10 if you’re feeling adventurous) books
  • Read the synopses of the books
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?

Outside of doing these posts semi-regularly I have also been culling my TBR list at random points when I’m bored – all of this is good in terms of getting my TBR to a reasonable amount of books but it also means that these posts are getting harder for me to do as I’m beginning to really agonise over whether to ditch or keep books on there. Not that any of this is a bad thing! Let’s get going on the 10 books under scrutiny today…

1. I Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith

Why is it there? As is typical of most classics on this list, I’m not entirely sure when or why this was added. However, having had a quick glance on Goodreads at the verdicts of my fellow readers, they said it’s a must read for fans of Jane Austen so I probably should give it a go.
Do I own it? Yes
Verdict? Keep

2. Love in a Cold Climate and Other Novels by Nancy Mitford

Why is it there? Once again, I have little to no recollection of how this ended up on my TBR. I likely decided that I knew nothing about the Mitfords so should give this a go. The thing is, so little time, so many books I want to read…
Do I own it? No
Verdict? Ditch

3. Decline and Fall by Evelyn Waugh

Why is it there? For some reason, I’ve decided I’ll quite like Evelyn Waugh books. The thing is… I’ve never read one. However, I’ve seen enough synopses to reckon out that I will probably indeed enjoy the likes of Brideshead Revisited and this book too.
Do I own it? Yes
Verdict? Keep Continue reading

Down the TBR Hole #23

Welcome folks to the twenty-third round of Down the TBR Hole! As I mentioned in my last round of DtTH (nope, that acronym isn’t particularly attractive, is it?), this little project has been a great way of weening down my TBR over the past year so I’ve decided to keep it up and make it a semi-regular feature in order to spring clean my TBR aka be realistic about what books I aspire to read and what books I actually will read.

For those of you who have no idea what I’m talking about, check out the previous posts via the tag or check out Lia at Lost in a Story who is the creator of this wonderful meme/project.

I’m trying to make this a regular feature of my blogging schedule because it’s good to regularly reevaluate if/why you want to read a book – that way you don’t come back to your TBR years later and have no clue why a title piqued your interest in the first place. I’ve also added a summary of results bit at the bottom of each round so I can track how many books I’ve kept and ditched from my TBR shelf in each round and overall.

Just a reminder of how this works:

  • Go to your goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added.
  • Take the first 5 (or 10 if you’re feeling adventurous) books
  • Read the synopses of the books
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?

Outside of doing these posts semi-regularly I have also been culling my TBR list at random points when I’m bored – all of this is good in terms of getting my TBR to a reasonable amount of books but it also means that these posts are getting harder for me to do as I’m beginning to really agonise over whether to ditch or keep books on there. Not that any of this is a bad thing! Let’s get going on the 10 books under scrutiny today…

1. A Single Man by Christopher Isherwood

Why is it there? I’ve seen the film and absolutely adored it, so naturally I wanted to read the book for myself. I don’t really know much about how this reads as a story, but I’m sure it will be enormously sad, based on how I felt about the film, and I just need to wait to be in the right mood for reading that sort of thing…
Do I own it? No
Verdict? Keep

2. The Old Curiosity Shop by Charles Dickens

Why is it there? Since I haven’t read nearly as many Dickens novels as I feel I ought to have, as a Literature graduate, I added all the Charles Dickens books to my TBR list many moons ago… and then did precisely nothing about it. As it stands, I’ve only read 5 of his novels and there’s like 15/16 – this is one of the many I haven’t yet read, but it sounds absolutely bonkers so I’m here for it, when I finally decide that reading a 500-page book is a good idea.
Do I own it? Yes
Verdict? Keep

3. Jackaby by William Ritter

Why is it there? I remember vaguely seeing this book pop up in some Booktubers’ hauled videos and then I saw Stephanie from Adventures of a Bibliophile review the series very positively, and that helped to move this book onto my actual TBR. It’s often described as a late 19th-century historical fiction/paranormal mystery that’s reminiscent of Doctor Who meets Sherlock, so I’m definitely up for trying that out sometime (hopefully) soon.
Do I own it? Yes
Verdict? Keep

Continue reading